Eiweiβkuchen – Egg White Cake

I often have egg whites left (my creme anglais is very popular) and this cake gets rid of 5 or 6 in one go. The other satisfying thing about this cake is its versatility: I throw in just about anything (within reason) I find in the pantry, so it tastes differently every time.

Basic recipe:

  • 5 – 6 egg whites (ca. 150 g)
  • 150 g caster sugar (I’ve not tried honey yet, but if you find out, let me know)
  • 100 g butter (melted and cooled a little)
  • 180 g flour
  • a generous pinch of baking powder
  • 150 g dried fruit (to taste)

Some ideas for variations:

  • I’m not a fan of wholemeal flour for this one, as it gets a little heavy, instead, I like to replace around one third of the flour with ground hazelnuts or almonds
  • I add some flavouring from a list that includes bitter almond essence, cinnamon, grated lemon zest, cardamon, finely chopped crystallised stem ginger, clove,… (not all in the same cake, though)
  • a hand full of coarsely chopped nuts or toasted almond flakes gives a nice texture
  • the fruit could be just sultanas (I like to use them soaked in rum for a few days)
  • a mix of chopped candied peel and sultanas works well, too, especially when using cinnamon and lemon zest
  • chopped dried apricots go well with almonds and bitter almond oil in this cake

Method:

  • beat the egg whites until very stiff
  • keep beating while gradually adding the sugar
  • continue to beat until you can cut the mixture with a knife
  • add the fruit and nuts (if you use coarse ones) to the mixture
  • gently fold in the still runny, somewhat cooled butter
  • lastly, fold in the sieved flour/baking powder and ground nuts (if you use them)
  • fill the mix into a buttered baking tin
  • bake at 170 – 180 °C for around 1 h
  • let the cake cool in the tin for 10 min, then turn it out
  • If you want to, finish it off with a layer of icing sugar or a light sugar glaze made with lemon juice, rum, Cointreau, depending on what you fancy (and who it is for)
  • the cake is not overly sweet, so it can stand a little extra sweetness on the top

The original inspiration for this one comes from ‘Bayerisches Kochbuch’.

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