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I’ve been blogging for a while about the Antarctic Quest 21 expedition that will take a team of eight onto the Forbidden Plateau on the central spine of the Antarctic Peninsula to install scientific equipment and down to the shores of the Weddell Sea to do some more of the same…see my previous posts here and here.

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See and hear what it takes to get scientific data from the heart of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Antarctic Quest 21 team and patrons have published their first story video, and as I guess that Forces Net is not the usual channel for most of you, below is a link.

It’s worth a watch, even if the video fails to represent all the scientific project the expedition will support – you can always check that out on the AQ21 website and by reading my ECO Magazine article.

Featured Image credit: British Services Antarctic Expedition 2012 (BSAE2012)

Working from home during lockdown saves me and my carbon footprint a daily 1.5 h commute and I have more flexibility with when and how I start my day.

Some mornings just beckon a walk along the river! And today, I was rewarded with the magic sparkle of a light frost on bluebells and mist over the water.

It’s a great headline: “Plastic Is Falling From The Sky- But Where’s It Coming From?”

The answer is not so great, because most of us are contributing: rubber rubbed off our car tyres.

Read the story here:

Featured Image: “Rainbow and the rain” by Ryan Ojibway is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Ever since I became aware of the incredible intelligence and social behaviour of octopus, I just can’t bring myself to eating cephalopods anymore.

I mean, nine brains!

This new study just highlights an incredible similarly between the way mammals and cephalopods sleep and dream…

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/03/octopuses-humans-sleep-two-stages?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=1bc0fb97f8-briefing-dy-20210326&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-1bc0fb97f8-45313974

Featured image: “Key West Octopus” by Joe Parks is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The light is beautiful.

I seize the moment and extend my morning outing with my dog to a walk along the river.

I am rewarded by the touch of morning sun on my face and two owls calling in the ancient woodland on the Devon bank.

A snipe flits off, startled.

Happiness comes from feeling gratitude for the moments of connecting with nature.

I smile.

Lovely signs is spring wherever I look!

Spring solstice in the northern hemisphere, and the oaks are cracking buds.

“oak before ash, we’re in for a splash”

If that’s holding true, we are going to have fabulous weather this summer.

Not that there are many ash left around here to check … cutting them down has become a management craze against ash dieback disease in the valley.

Almost like a watercolour painting.

Only better: it’s real.

A little farther than strictly local, I stretched my range a little beyond 7 miles to enjoy a good walk along the Cornish coast.

Blackthorn like a bridal wreath

Beautiful, uplifting, entertaining and even more so because I enjoyed this scene with a friend and our dogs.

This is haunting!

Sperm whales are even more intelligent and organised than we knew, which makes it even more sad and outrageous that we hunted them to near extinction and some of us still do.

Read the ‘easy’ version in the Guardian and the research paper I. The reference therein.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/mar/17/sperm-whales-in-19th-century-shared-ship-attack-information

What have we failed to learn about all the species we eradicated out of greed, ignorance and ‘don’t care attitude?

The blackthorn is starting to blossom in sheltered spots.

Soon, the delicate detail of individual flowers will be masked by the snowstorm-like appearance of white bloom along hedges and motorways.

Flowers first then leaves.

A relative of the Winter Heliotrope, Petasites fragrans.

Or, as my friend Lizzie calls it ‘pestites…’ it spreads!

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